May 11, 2021

Hacking into the Mainframe


Hacking into the Mainframe
"I'm in." The RussianLife files

If the passcode to your most secure online information is something along the lines of "password," "12345," or "RussianLifeRocks," you're not alone (especially for that last one). A recent study by Russia's National Payment Card System (NPCS) reveals that less than a third of Russians take adequate care with their internet security.

According to the data, not even 28% of Russian internet users have different passwords for each site (Not gonna lie, we're pretty impressed). 17% use the same password on multiple sites. 49% use difficult passwords, 44% medium, and (fortunately) only 1% use simple passwords.

Reportedly, 76% of Russians remember passwords off the top of their heads (also impressive!). 38% use autosave functions in their browsers, and 12% use apps or programs to save their passwords. Nearly a third go old-school, opting for sticky notes or other paper methods.

The head of the NPCS comments that, of course, the strongest passwords are random combinations of characters. The drawback being that they're tough to remember.

But that doesn't mean computer security isn't important. After all, Russian cyber stuff is pretty spooky.

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The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
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The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas

This exciting new trilogy by a Russian author – who has been compared to Orhan Pamuk and Umberto Eco – vividly recreates a lost world, yet its passions and characters are entirely relevant to the present day. Full of mystery, memorable characters, and non-stop adventure, The Pet Hawk of the House of Abbas is a must read for lovers of historical fiction and international thrillers.  
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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

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