December 12, 2022

What Is Born from Fire


What Is Born from Fire
A screenshot from the video. YouTube, Monetochka.

On December 6, the internet-famous Russian singer Monetochka released a music video on Youtube for her song "Gori" ("Burn") that directly criticizes pro-government propaganda.

Initially released in 2019 as "Gori, Gori, Gori" ("Burn, Burn, Burn"), the song addressed not only the wildfires in Siberia at the time but also the persecution of artists in Russia. In that video she employed the "Everything is Fine" meme, showing her surroundings in flames while she sat on a chair with a forced smile. All proceeds from the video were directed to Greenpeace's efforts to combat the wildfires.

From her exile in Lithuania, Monetochka has now released a new video for the song. In the new version, the world is grey and ordinary citizens are transformed into furniture by a missile coming from their televisions. Then, all of them are burned up by authorities, who dance around in a circle. Suddenly a new man is born from the ashes. The authorities give him a suit and he reenters society. The video is below.

Monetochka leaves us asking: when the world burns, who will be the phoenix born from its ashes?

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