December 22, 2021

Trading COVID for a Car


Trading COVID for a Car
This is just an example of a GAZ Sobol, not the real one from this situation.  Photo from Mr. Choppers (CC BY-SA 3.0)

A resident from Vladivostok had no idea how to repay the doctors and nurses who worked so tirelessly to save him after he fought a three-week-long battle with COVID-19, but then he realized that the machine sitting in the garage might just do the trick.  

The machine in question is a GAZ “Sobol,” a member of a series of Russian-made minivans and trucks. While in the hospital, the patient came upon the knowledge that the facilities were lacking the proper resources needed to transport patients. Previously, they had just an old mini-bus to serve this function. 

The hospital plans to modify the van so that it is more suitable for medical personnel and then put it into action. Certainly a great act of holiday charity

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