April 19, 2021

Spring Cleaning for a Cause


Spring Cleaning for a Cause
Volunteerism means spending quality time with those you are helping too.  RODNAE Productions | pexels.com

In anticipation of the Spring holidays (hello, Orthodox Easter,) volunteers in the Moscow region are offering the elderly a helping hand with their tidying up. Despite taking place every weekday between April 15 to 29, the event is called "Clean Thursday" (which in Russian not only has some catchy alliteration, but it's also the name for the holy holiday that takes place on the Thursday before Easter). 

In order to get help, all any Muscovite babushka (or dedushka) needs to do is call the hotline number and request assistance. Additionally, they will need to provide a negative COVID-19 test or some proof that they have already had or been immunized from the virus. 

This will be the sixth year that this goodwill operation takes place in Moscow. Over the years, a total of one and a half thousand volunteers have supported three and a half thousand elderly Muscovites. Hopefully, the volunteers get some homemade jam or fresh blini in return for their service. 

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