June 29, 2022

Suing for Peace, and Compensation


Suing for Peace, and Compensation

"The looting of Ukrainian goods for export – including grain and steel – has already led to rising prices and an increase in the number of people dying of hunger worldwide. This barbarism must be stopped, and Russia must pay in full. I believe in justice, and I will fight for it.”

– Rinat Akhmetov, the Ukrainian businessman who is suing Russia

On June 27, Ukrainian businessman and owner of Azovstal steel plant Rinat Akhmetov filed a lawsuit against Russia in the European Court of Human rights. Akhmetov seeks compensation for his  personal businesses losses caused by the invasion, but also wider losses.

Akhmetov's industrial plant was brutally targeted; he is one of many businessmen whose assets have become targets. Akhmetov's mill is known for how it was bombarded with Russian shells, despite it sheltering many of Mariupol's residents. It was also the location for Ukrainian forces' last stand in the city

Akhmetov hopes to not only receive compensation for his own losses: he also wants Russia to rectify all damages it has wreaked throughout Ukraine, the violation of its property rights, and the global food crisis that has resulted.

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The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.
Woe From Wit (bilingual)

Woe From Wit (bilingual)

One of the most famous works of Russian literature, the four-act comedy in verse Woe from Wit skewers staid, nineteenth century Russian society, and it positively teems with “winged phrases” that are essential colloquialisms for students of Russian and Russian culture.
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A Taste of Russia

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The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

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Faith & Humor: Notes from Muscovy

Faith & Humor: Notes from Muscovy

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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
Dostoyevsky Bilingual

Dostoyevsky Bilingual

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