January 05, 2022

Dead Morose: Never Too Late for the New Year


Dead Morose: Never Too Late for the New Year

“We answer each of them individually. There are a lot of letters. We didn’t expect that there would be so many. There is no negative at all. Thank God no one is writing any filth. Everything somehow really worked out very soulfully. This kind of thing is a sincere message to the other. We have not regretted a single thing."

– Representative of the Omsk ritual company “Heritage”

This year, a deceased Father Christmas by the name of Dead Morose will deliver personalized New Year’s letters to departed loved ones through a service offered through the Russia-based company “Heritage.”

According to the company’s advertisement on Instagram, the service is intended to help individuals grieve the loss of loved ones. “Writing a letter is a way to continue a relationship with the deceased person and tell him what you were unable to say during his life.”

Interested customers can order delivery of the letters, which are written by individuals and not bots, until January 14. No letters will be published publicly.

For this, all customers should be grateful. No one will ever know how much Uncle Misha hated watching the New Year’s classic “The Irony of Fate” at babushka’s every year – but babushka can now!

 

 

 

 

 

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