January 24, 2023

Where Are the Actors?


Where Are the Actors?

Russia's Ministry of Culture has begun "disciplinary checks" in Moscow theaters after a famous actor made his anti-war sentiments known in an interview.

On December 31, People's Artist of Russia Dmitry Nazarov sat with Ekho Moskvy journalist Ksenia Larina to discuss the emigration to Israel of fellow actor Anatoly Bely. Nazarov said, without naming names, "Tolya is not the only one, many have left."

For that interview, in January both Nazarov and his wife, Honorable Artist of Russia Olga Vasilyeva, were fired from the Moscow Art Theater. Since then, the Ministry of Culture has been snooping around theaters for similar sentiments.

Komsomolskaya Pravda said many actors are linking the inspections with Nazarov's remark that "many have left." It reported that the ministry is reviewing labor reports and seeing "who is at the workplace, and who is on a leave of absence, and why has this leave been prolonged to several months, and in which shows have backup actors been used."

The ministry said that the inspections relate to actors rejoining the workforce after the end of coronavirus restrictions.

 

 


 

 

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