March 20, 2020

Vodka vs. Coronavirus


Vodka vs. Coronavirus
Can vodka help defeat coronavirus?
Chris Ralston on Unsplash

As it turns out, vodka cannot help defend against the coronavirus, according to Evgeny Bryun, chief narcologist at Russia’s Ministry of Health. Bryun said that any infection is toxic to the body, and alcohol only adds to that toxicity.

Moreover, Bryun added that there is no point in using vodka to sterilize your hands. Alcohol evaporates from surfaces very quickly, so you would need to be constantly sterilizing your hands with vodka for there to be any effect. (Vodka is, moreover, just 40 percent alcohol, and a 60 percent concentration is recommended for killing those corona beasties.)

For those who try to use alcohol to disinfect their mouths, Bryun reminded folks that viruses enter the body through mucous membranes, not only those in the oral cavity, but also the eyes and nose, “…and pouring alcohol in there is problematic,” he said.

Bryun concluded by adding that smoking will also not help against the coronavirus.

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