March 14, 2022

Subversion Subverted


Subversion Subverted
Putin must now figure out who ruined his perfect plan. Image from the Kremlin's Twitter

Recent reports say that Putin's plan was to infiltrate the Ukrainian military from the rear through subversive activities. At least, that's what Putin thought was going to happen, until over $5 billion were stolen from the campaign.

This past week, the Ukrainian security agency, SBU, uncovered the organizers behind the new proposed "People's Republics" in western Ukraine (echoing those in eastern Ukraine). A large sum in rubles were allocated by the Russian government to these subversive activities from 2014 to the present, all of which was supposed to combine with Russia's all-out propaganda campaigns in Ukraine so that when Russian soldiers arrived in Ukraine they would be met with flowers.

This massive sum was meant to include not only propaganda, but also "agitation activities, agents among nationalist organizations, a network of activists, and so on." Instead, for eight years Putin received disinformation about the likelihood of support from the Ukrainian army, and the information he was given turned out to be the opposite of the truth.

It's a bummer when kleptocracy turns out not to work in your favor.

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