December 07, 2021

Snow More!


Snow More!
Sad students wait for more snow days.  Photo from the website hornews.com

With an unusually warm winter continuing to take place all over the world, an unusual climate protest takes place at a university in the city of Chelyabinsk where students actually demand more snow.

Typically, the average temperature in the city during the month of November is 23 degrees Fahrenheit, but this year it has rarely gone below freezing. So, in response, students at a local university staged a flash mob in order to demand the return of their typical frosty weather.

Students stood outside with signs reading "I want snow" and "the QR code for snow" (a joke about QR codes being used to regulate vaccination status during the Coronavirus Pandemic). When interviewed, students mentioned how strange it was to them that the city was so warm this time of year.

Some students, who traveled from Kazakstan for university, joked about having been afraid for the cold winter in Chelyabinsk and are rather disappointed to not see it come to fruition. As a former student who also traveled to Russia to attend university, I would suggest not looking a gift horse in the mouth!

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