February 14, 2023

Show Me Your Face


Show Me Your Face
Cars crossing the Russian border. Poligon.media, Telegram.

Russian authorities plan to tighten the screws at the country's borders by installing face-recognition systems to identify drivers entering or leaving the country. The move directly violates a law President Vladimir Putin signed on December 29, 2022, prohibiting the forced collection of biometric data by the government or businesses.

Concerns over border security rose after the killing of pro-war activist and journalist Darya Dugina, as the killer allegedly crossed Russia's border with Ukraine. Opposition leaders escaping Russia while under house arrest may have also contributed to the new measure, since the current video surveillance systems can't detect such crossings.

The systems will be installed at nine different points. There will be three checkpoints along the Russo-Chinese border (Zabaykalsk, Pogranichny, and Kraskino), another three along the borders with Poland and Lithuania (Bagrationovsk, Mamonovo, and Chernyshevskoye), and three  more at crossings between Russia and Kazakhstan (Mashtakovo, Orsk, and Sagarchin).

The project is expected to cost R830 million ($11.5 million) and is planned to be completed before November 25, 2023.

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