December 21, 2022

War, Not Fish


War, Not Fish
Still Live with Vobla. German Evseev

The Central District Court of Tyumen found local resident Alisa Klimentova guilty of "discrediting the Russian army" for writing "No to w*r" (Нет в***е!) on a roadway.

Klimentova was fined R30,000.

Interestingly, Klimentova's case was originally heard in October, and it was dismissed by the local court, because she was able to convince the judge that her inscription actually meant Нет вобле (No to vobla) – meaning the Caspian roach fish that is salt-cured and commonly consumed with beer.

Woman wearing anti fish tshirt
No fish allowed!

Not willing to let vobla be bygones, the local police filed an appeal. The Tyumen Regional Court overturned the decision of the Central District Court and sent the case back to trial, where Klimentova was convicted.

Needless to say, Klimentova's initial action attracted lots of public attention. In particular, the journalist Ksenia Sobchak (Putin's reputed goddaughter, herself a "foreign agent," who has since fled to Israel) launched a clothing line with the inscription "no to vobla," and the comedian Semyon Slepakov wrote a song on the them (below).

 

 

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