September 15, 2021

I'm Not Dead Yet!


I'm Not Dead Yet!
You gotta admit, they do make them look pretty cozy with all the added padding these days.  Photo by Max Pixel

Police in the Komi Republic recently found a resident (or potential vampire?) sleeping in a display coffin at a funeral home. 

The suspect in question was actually not a member of the undead but rather a normal, but very drunk, human being who only wanted a comfy place to rest in peace before his inevitable hangover.  In his stupor, he had broken a shop window and simply let himself inside the funeral home for a quick nap.

But of course, what seem like great ideas when we are drunk usually are not. In this case, this particular stroke of genius will cost this individual a criminal case against the owner of the shop for intentional destruction of property. But sometimes a good night's sleep is worth it, no?

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The Little Golden Calf

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This mesmerizing novel from one of Russia’s most important modern authors traces the life journey of a selfless Russian everywoman. In the wake of the Soviet breakup, inexorable forces drag Vera across the breadth of the Russian empire. Facing a relentless onslaught of human and social trials, she swims against the current of life, countering adversity and pain with compassion and hope, in many ways personifying Mother Russia’s torment and resilience amid the Soviet disintegration.
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93 Untranslatable Russian Words

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Woe From Wit (bilingual)

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