July 21, 2021

Let Sleeping Bears Lie


Let Sleeping Bears Lie
Simply put: don't poke the bear.  Photo by Daniele Levis Pelusi via Unsplash

Russian zoos and bears go hand-in-paw, but they don't make for particularly interesting exhibit pieces during their lazy winter months. It is for this reason that the Novosibirsk Zoo is planning on creating exhibits that will allow zoo visitors to observe how a bear takes its long winter nap.

The design itself is the first like this in the country and is incredibly diverse. It will have fifteen separate dens made for the unique needs of each individual bear species.

The dens will have glass windows that visitors may peek (quietly) through to see the slumbering giants. Zookeepers will of course encourage the public to keep their voices down as best they can, but they also aren't convinced that this will work entirely. But they believe that if the bears do wake up from their hibernation, it could still prove beneficial for scientific studies.

The constriction of these dens won't be complete until at least 2022, so hopefully, the teddy bears will have some time to stock up on some z's (and possibly buy some earplugs?) before then. 

Let's just hope they don't visit the country clubs while they are at it. 

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