June 21, 2021

Drinking Not En-Cur-Aged


Drinking Not En-Cur-Aged
Don't drink and dog! Photograph by Jennifer Lim-Tamkican on Unsplash

On June 9, online news outlet Izvestiya reported that Russia’s State Duma may support an initiative to ban drunk Russians, along with children under 14, from walking their pets.

Senators proposed a bill that would not only regulate the level of drunkenness of pet owners out for a stroll with their charges, but that may also determine leash length. The punishable degree of intoxication is up for review, as some experts believe a small buzz is not enough to penalize an owner.

The legislation is part of a larger initiative to regulate the appropriate treatment of furry (or scaly—the affected pet species are yet to be specified) friends. Supporters defended the rules with anecdotes of citizens being attacked when dog owners walk fighting breeds without a muzzle or leash.

The bill may also grant Russia’s regions the right to cap the number of pets kept in an apartment and prevent owners from using corridors and stairwells to house their animals. Some members of the Duma are concerned about the costs and personnel that would be required to enforce the legislation, but proponents of the bill have suggested delegating the responsibility to the police officers who already test drivers for intoxication.

Perhaps legislators should get on with it—isn't it best to prohibit what really shouldn’t happen to a dog?

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