March 30, 2021

Heavily Taxed


Heavily Taxed
50 pounds of rubles is decidedly no small amount of change.  Paolinio | pixabay.com

It seems like a resident of Severodvinsk wanted to get their arm-day workout in while they brought their tax payment to the bank: they paid their entire R78,715 (approximately $630 USD) total in cold hard coins. The whole sum had to be brought in two large metal boxes and weighed nearly 50 pounds.

Tax season is hitting us all pretty hard, but at least you aren't one of the bank tellers who had to count the payment out by hand! Although it appears that someone may have made a counting mistake, as revealed by the math-wizards over at meduza.io.

By calculating the weight of an individual R10 coin, they were able to determine that in the 22-kilogram payment there must have at least a dividend of R200 (approximately $3 USD). That's a fairly small amount for such a hefty collection, but given that the payment was actually made in a mixture of R10, R1, 50-kopek, and 10-kopek coins, it's likely that the true amount of money is a lot more (like American "cents," there are 100 kopeks in a ruble).

Who knows, maybe a couple of pieces of paper money were slid in and not mentioned in the paper report. Or maybe the poor bailiffs just got too exhausted and miscounted a few coins. We aren't sure, and who could blame them!

Although, they can't possibly have the worst job in Russia. 

 

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