January 29, 2022

Happy Birthday Anton Pavlovich


Happy Birthday Anton Pavlovich
Anton Chekhov and Olga Knipper, 1901.

Today, January 29, is Anton Pavlovich Chekhov's 162nd birthday. Let's celebrate with some links to stories we have published about the great writer in Russian Life and online.

Let's begin with the collection of his writings we published in bilingual format. What better way to make use of Chekhov than by improving your Russian by reading his stories?

We've published a few bios of him in the magazine, including this one, and this one. We've written about his dog, about when he met Tolstoy, and about Chekhovian fillers. And then there is Chekhov on the typhus epidemic, which is a bit, well, topical. That should be enough to get you started. Then look below, in the Additional Reading links. We'll add some other stories of interest down there. Including a translation of a story by him we just released today.

"The happy man only feels happy because the unhappy man bears his burden in silence."

– Anton Chekhov, "Gooseberries"

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