September 07, 2022

Я Вас Люблю


Я Вас Люблю

"I love you." 

                                   – Journalist Ivan Safronov after being sentenced to 22 years in prison for treason

On September 5, Ivan Safronov was sentenced to 22 years in prison for acts of treason against Russia. Less than a week prior to the sentencing, the prosecutor's office was demanding Safronov be sent to prison for 24 years. This verdict is not only shocking considering the crime, but the length as well; in Russia, the criminal code states that acts of high treason warrant up to 20 years in prison, not more.

The court claimed that Safronov committed acts of high treason by giving secret information to the German and Czech governments. However, Russian independent news agencies have shown that almost all of the information that Safronov released could be found on the internet.

The trial was not an easy one for Safronov. He spent two years in pre-trial detention, one of his lawyers was forced to leave the country, and the other is in jail. According to the court, one of the reasons behind the extensive sentence is Safronov's firm spirit and adamant refusal to cooperate.

After he was sentenced and left the courtroom, supporters cheered him on. Safronov responded by giving his love.

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