September 01, 2022

Five Years Ago Means Five Days in Prison


Five Years Ago Means Five Days in Prison
"I’m leaving for five days for spreading 'He’s not Dimon for you' (everyone watch!). And I feel incredibly free! See you, friends!" Twitter, Nikolay Kasyan

On August 25, Moscow candidate for municipal duties Nikolay Kasyan was arrested after officials discovered an objectionable five-year-old post on Twitter. The post revealed Kasyan's support for opposition politician Alexei Navalny, who at the time was investigating former prime minister Dmitry Medvedev.

In Article 20.3 of the Code of Administrative Offenses, it states that a candidate can not participate in an election within a year of having been involved with an "extremist organization," such as one associated with Navalny. Because of this article, Kasyan has been removed from the election. Even though his Twitter post was five years ago, its recent discovery has cost Kasyan not only the election but also five days in prison.

Since June, dozens of candidates have been either removed from elections or denied registration for having participated in "extremist organizations." Despite the fact that Article 20.3 places just a one-year time restriction for participating in such organizations, people like Kasyan, who may have shown support years ago, are often indicted. 

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