October 13, 2021

Being the Face Sans Facebook


Being the Face Sans Facebook

“The president’s website is working. There are no problems.”

– Press Secretary for the President of Russia Dmitry Peskov

Go ahead and wipe the sweat from your brows, dear friends – not even Facebook can take down website of the President of the Russian Federation. On October 4, Peskov announced that all was well with the President's representation, at least, when an outage of Facebook’s servers also temporarily derailed affiliated applications, including WhatsApp and Instagram.

But for the Russian President’s website to avoid calamity during a Facebook outage?! Perhaps the Federation is closer to Internet independence than it seems…

 

 

 

 

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