June 15, 2022

A Loss for Justice


A Loss for Justice

"The Committee against Torture has been protecting the rights of citizens who have suffered from torture and inhuman treatment by government officials all their lives. Despite the obvious benefits of this mission, the authorities have been trying for many years to give it an alien and harmful outline... Apparently, the authorities are giving a signal that torture is becoming (or has already become) part of state policy and is not a problem. Here I would like to remind you about the Constitution, where torture is prohibited (for the time being)."

– Sergey Babinets, chairman of the Russian Committee against Torture, on Telegram

The employees of the Committee against Torture in Russia have decided to officially dissolve the group after the Kremlin recently named it a "foreign agent".

Being given the title of "foreign agent" is harmful to the group because it diminishes their work in the eyes of the Russian public. It also implies that torture has increasingly become more normal for the Kremlin to carry out, despite the Russian constitution. 

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