May 10, 2022

Immortal Anti-War Demos


Immortal Anti-War Demos

Amid yesterday's Immortal Regiment (Бессмертный полк) demonstrations throughout Russia, many Russians showed grit and courage by subverting the overall message, noting that their relatives and ancestors fought for peace, for a better world.

For fear of reprisals, many posted their images with faces blocked out. Many peace demonstrators were nonetheless arrested.

Images taken from Facebook.

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