August 03, 2022

Confusion Amidst the Fog


Confusion Amidst the Fog

“It’s unclear what happened, but you can’t bring people back to life.” 

                                   –  Alina Nesterenko, whose husband was a prisoner in Russian-occupied Donetsk

The Russian-run prison camp Olenivka was bombed on July 28; both sides claim innocence in the matter, but one thing is clear: over 50 Ukrainian prisoners of war died in the assault.

Ukraine believes that Russia used the attack to cover up the mistreatment of prisoners and the violation of their human rights under United Nations and Red Cross guidelines. President Voldymyr Zelensky and Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba are urging the organizations to intervene.

Russia, on the other hand, claims that Ukraine attacked the prison camp with an American-supplied HIMARS system. Russia said Ukraine sought to deter soldiers from surrendering. 

Neither side's assertions can be verified, as no independent observers have been allowed on the scene.

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