December 01, 2019

Russian Denials Inspire Pet Meme


Russian Denials Inspire Pet Meme

Mass graves, dead bodies in the street and looted homes in towns of Bucha, Irpen, Gostomel and others under extensive Russian occupation in March were documented by countless media, bolstered by witness accounts and even satellite imagery. But Russian officials issued denial after denial, while their propaganda machines spun conspiracy theories and published fakes of their own, all to sow confusion among television viewers.

So blatant and incongruous were the denials of the Russian state that Russia's Twitter users compared them with pets caught red-handed at the scene of their crimes.


It's not so clear-cut... We will never find out the truth...
What happened?
Let's investigate:
1. The ham bit itself, because it's anti-ham.
2. The cat is not at fault. He was afraid the ham would be eaten 
by the owner, and saved the ham from her.
3. This is an infowar between the cat and the ham. The photo is a fake. Look how the lines between the kitchen tiles are uneven.
4. I am not a ham expert, it's unclear whether it is bitten or not.
5. They said on TV that this is not a cat.
 

 

Well, everything is not so clear

 

It's not so clear. We must look at other versions. The wallpaper could
have been like this from the beginning. We must also consider that
the wallpaper could tear itself in order to discredit the dog.

 

I don't think we will ever know the truth.
Everything is very ambiguous and smells of a provocation
by Western intelligence.

 

It's an ambiguous situation, anybody could have chewed
on this coaster, it's important to understand
who benefits from this.

 

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