July 08, 2022

The Center of Denial


The Center of Denial
It wasn't me! World Economic Forum

Russian president Vladimir Putin has rejected news reports that Russia directly shelled a shopping center in Kremenchug on June 27. The attack killed 18, and, as of June 29, 21 people are still missing.

The Russian Defense Ministry claims that the Russian army did not fire on the shopping center, but instead on an ammunition hangar located nearby. Because of the nearby attack, the center caught fire, and that is when the chaos ensued. The Ministry also claims that the center was not open at the time of the fire.

On the Mayak radio station, Putin released his own statement, claiming that technology is so advanced that the missile strikes can hit precise targets and that such a mistake could not have occurred. 

The statements of the Russian Defense Ministry and Putin help us to understand how they are justifying Russia's criminal actions in their own minds, but far too many accounts have shown their statements to be blatantly false

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