April 05, 2020

A Russian Eiffel Tower



A Russian Eiffel Tower
So romantic. It makes us want to eat some stinky cheese, learn to mime, and sing La Marseillaise. Magnitogorsk Administration

Russians like their monuments. However, the opening of a new landmark in the Ural city of Magnitogorsk has opened not with a bang but with a whimper.

A new replica of the Eiffel Tower was unveiled in the industrial city. The local administration explained: "In every city, there should be a piece of Paris. Now, this is available in Magnitogorsk."

The closest Eiffel Tower replica to the city was previously a 50-meter-tall cell tower in the town of Parizh, 100 kilometers from Magnitogorsk. The one in Magnitogorsk, although perhaps more central, is just a little over two meters tall.

Of course, the entirety of Chelyabinsk Oblast is under self-isolation orders because of Coronavirus. So citizens will have to wait until the pandemic passes to enjoy their new monument.

Americans, on the other hand, can tide themselves over in Paris, Texas.

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