March 10, 2022

The "Z" Symbol


The "Z" Symbol
A pro-war symbol YoutTube, EuroNews

Ivan Kuliak, 21 years old, took third place at last week’s Gymnastics World Cup in Doha, Qatar. Upon taking his place on the winner's podium, the audience and viewers at home witnessed a shocking support of the Russian invasion by Ivan as he wore the letter "Z" in white tape on the center of his chest. 

This otherwise innocuous symbol was recently adopted to show support for the unprovoked Russian invasion of Ukraine led by Vladimir Putin. The symbol, a simple letter "Z,”was seen on Russian tanks and vehicles entering Ukraine (remarkably, the letter isn't a part of the Russian or Ukrainian alphabets).

The International Gymnastics Federation (FIG) stated they are working towards disciplinary action through the Gymnastics Ethics Foundation. Speculation rose that the Ivan may have been coerced or even forced to wear the symbol. However, Valentina Rodioenko, Russian national gymnastics team head coach, stated this was not the case. Rodioenko denied any involvement in the stunt, stating she was not aware Ivan was going to wear the symbol.

We can only hope that the FIG follows through with their statements, and disciplinary action is taken. A video of Kuliak taking to the podium can be seen here.

 

You Might Also Like

A Prayer for Ukraine
  • March 08, 2022

A Prayer for Ukraine

In 2014, Ukrainian composer Valentin Silvestrov wrote this beautiful short orchestral work, "Prayer for Ukraine." A German orchestra is sharing it as a symphonic symbol of solidarity and hope.
Blue and Yellow Lights
  • March 11, 2022

Blue and Yellow Lights

Many famous landmarks across the globe have been illuminated with blue and yellow lights, showing solidarity with Ukraine. 
No War Please
  • March 04, 2022

No War Please

Russian tennis player Andrey Rublev writes a "no war please" message on a camera after a match. 
Like this post? Get a weekly email digest + member-only deals

Some of Our Books

Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
The Moscow Eccentric

The Moscow Eccentric

Advance reviewers are calling this new translation "a coup" and "a remarkable achievement." This rediscovered gem of a novel by one of Russia's finest writers explores some of the thorniest issues of the early twentieth century.
Murder and the Muse

Murder and the Muse

KGB Chief Andropov has tapped Matyushkin to solve a brazen jewel heist from Picasso’s wife at the posh Metropole Hotel. But when the case bleeds over into murder, machinations, and international intrigue, not everyone is eager to see where the clues might lead.
Russian Rules

Russian Rules

From the shores of the White Sea to Moscow and the Northern Caucasus, Russian Rules is a high-speed thriller based on actual events, terrifying possibilities, and some really stupid decisions.
Fish: A History of One Migration

Fish: A History of One Migration

This mesmerizing novel from one of Russia’s most important modern authors traces the life journey of a selfless Russian everywoman. In the wake of the Soviet breakup, inexorable forces drag Vera across the breadth of the Russian empire. Facing a relentless onslaught of human and social trials, she swims against the current of life, countering adversity and pain with compassion and hope, in many ways personifying Mother Russia’s torment and resilience amid the Soviet disintegration.
93 Untranslatable Russian Words

93 Untranslatable Russian Words

Every language has concepts, ideas, words and idioms that are nearly impossible to translate into another language. This book looks at nearly 100 such Russian words and offers paths to their understanding and translation by way of examples from literature and everyday life. Difficult to translate words and concepts are introduced with dictionary definitions, then elucidated with citations from literature, speech and prose, helping the student of Russian comprehend the word/concept in context.
The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
The Samovar Murders

The Samovar Murders

The murder of a poet is always more than a murder. When a famous writer is brutally stabbed on the campus of Moscow’s Lumumba University, the son of a recently deposed African president confesses, and the case assumes political implications that no one wants any part of.
Woe From Wit (bilingual)

Woe From Wit (bilingual)

One of the most famous works of Russian literature, the four-act comedy in verse Woe from Wit skewers staid, nineteenth century Russian society, and it positively teems with “winged phrases” that are essential colloquialisms for students of Russian and Russian culture.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts

Our Contacts

Russian Life
73 Main Street, Suite 402
Montpelier VT 05602

802-223-4955