October 25, 2021

Scoot Safely


Scoot Safely
Because scooters aren't fast enough to outrun the reach of the law. The Russian Life files

Electric scooters are undeniably fun, and there's nothing that says undeniably fun like regulations from the Russian Ministries of Transport and Internal Affairs.

These two agencies have recently released a set of rules for the safe and legal use of electric and gyroscopic scooters. This should probably be unsurprising, since Russians probably like riding scooters as much as anyone.

The rules state that scooters should top out at 25 kph (15 mph) and weigh a maximum of 35 kg (77 lbs). Operators should be over the age of 14, and should ride on the right side of the road or on the sidewalk. The speed limit is actually an increase, as the new statute will override a 2019 law capping scooter top speed at 20 kph (12.5 mph).

These regulations affect not just scooters, but any "means of individual mobility" (SIM, in the Russian acronym), defined as a "vehicle with one or more wheels (rollers), intended for individual movement of a person through the use of an engine (motors): electric scooters, electric skateboards, gyro scooters, segways, unicycles, and other similar means."

While safety is important, we are looking forward to documenting the inevitable scooter-versus-police chase to barrel through a Russian city at a brisk thirty miles per hour.

You Might Also Like

Running City
  • July 01, 2012

Running City

There is no better way to get to know Moscow than to explore it on foot. And no better way to enjoy the exploration than to make a game of it!
Veliky Ustyug
  • April 26, 2016

Veliky Ustyug

Yuli Lyubeznikov and Alexandra Ivanova show off their town, one of the oldest in the Russian North: Veliky Ustyug
Scooter Blacklist
  • May 26, 2021

Scooter Blacklist

The Moscow City Duma is proposing safety regulations that will help prevent Muscovites from scootering into peril. 
Not-So Smart Crosswalks
  • January 18, 2021

Not-So Smart Crosswalks

When the Russian city of Salekhard tried to upgrade its pedestrian crosswalks, crisscrossed chaos ensued.
Like this post? Get a weekly email digest + member-only deals

Some of Our Books

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

The Frogs Who Begged for a Tsar (bilingual)

The fables of Ivan Krylov are rich fonts of Russian cultural wisdom and experience – reading and understanding them is vital to grasping the Russian worldview. This new edition of 62 of Krylov’s tales presents them side-by-side in English and Russian. The wonderfully lyrical translations by Lydia Razran Stone are accompanied by original, whimsical color illustrations by Katya Korobkina.
The Little Golden Calf

The Little Golden Calf

Our edition of The Little Golden Calf, one of the greatest Russian satires ever, is the first new translation of this classic novel in nearly fifty years. It is also the first unabridged, uncensored English translation ever, and is 100% true to the original 1931 serial publication in the Russian journal 30 Dnei. Anne O. Fisher’s translation is copiously annotated, and includes an introduction by Alexandra Ilf, the daughter of one of the book’s two co-authors.
Moscow and Muscovites

Moscow and Muscovites

Vladimir Gilyarovsky's classic portrait of the Russian capital is one of Russians’ most beloved books. Yet it has never before been translated into English. Until now! It is a spectactular verbal pastiche: conversation, from gutter gibberish to the drawing room; oratory, from illiterates to aristocrats; prose, from boilerplate to Tolstoy; poetry, from earthy humor to Pushkin. 
Dostoyevsky Bilingual

Dostoyevsky Bilingual

Bilingual series of short, lesser known, but highly significant works that show the traditional view of Dostoyevsky as a dour, intense, philosophical writer to be unnecessarily one-sided. 
At the Circus (bilingual)

At the Circus (bilingual)

This wonderful novella by Alexander Kuprin tells the story of the wrestler Arbuzov and his battle against a renowned American wrestler. Rich in detail and characterization, At the Circus brims with excitement and life. You can smell the sawdust in the big top, see the vivid and colorful characters, sense the tension build as Arbuzov readies to face off against the American.
Okudzhava Bilingual

Okudzhava Bilingual

Poems, songs and autobiographical sketches by Bulat Okudzhava, the king of the Russian bards. 
Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod: A Novel in Many Voices

Stargorod is a mid-sized provincial city that exists only in Russian metaphorical space. It has its roots in Gogol, and Ilf and Petrov, and is a place far from Moscow, but close to Russian hearts. It is a place of mystery and normality, of provincial innocence and Black Earth wisdom. Strange, inexplicable things happen in Stargorod. So do good things. And bad things. A lot like life everywhere, one might say. Only with a heavy dose of vodka, longing and mystery.
The Samovar Murders

The Samovar Murders

The murder of a poet is always more than a murder. When a famous writer is brutally stabbed on the campus of Moscow’s Lumumba University, the son of a recently deposed African president confesses, and the case assumes political implications that no one wants any part of.
Fearful Majesty

Fearful Majesty

This acclaimed biography of one of Russia’s most important and tyrannical rulers is not only a rich, readable biography, it is also surprisingly timely, revealing how many of the issues Russia faces today have their roots in Ivan’s reign.
The Latchkey Murders

The Latchkey Murders

Senior Lieutenant Pavel Matyushkin is back on the case in this prequel to the popular mystery Murder at the Dacha, in which a serial killer is on the loose in Khrushchev’s Moscow...

About Us

Russian Life is a publication of a 30-year-young, award-winning publishing house that creates a bimonthly magazine, books, maps, and other products for Russophiles the world over.

Latest Posts

Our Contacts

Russian Life
73 Main Street, Suite 402
Montpelier VT 05602

802-223-4955