May 26, 2021

Scooter Blacklist


Scooter Blacklist
Врум-врум (vroom-vroom).  Photograph by Let's Kick via unsplash.com

Anyone who has been to Moscow knows how popular electric scooters have become. But, with great scooter-power comes great responsibility. Now the city of Moscow is proposing a new measure that would allow the Department of Transportation to create a "blacklist" of individuals deemed unfit for scooter rental within the city. 

Needless to say, the intent here is public and traffic safety. The proposal also hopes to set special scooter-specific speed limits in certain areas. The limits would apply to all individual mobility vehicles (hoverboards, Segways, and electric bikes are also impacted). 

The Duma is also proposing regs that would prohibit more than one individual from riding a scooter at a time, any person from operating a scooter on a highway, as well as the operation of a scooter while under the influence of alcohol (it was really only a matter of time).

To make scooter driving more accessible, officials are hoping to soon offer special scooter training courses, and they want to attach both front and rear-facing headlights to each tiny vehicle in the city's fleet. 

The speaker of the Duma hopes that their advanced scooter legislation will be a model for not just other regions of the country but also possibly, the whole world. 

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