June 14, 2022

Sci-fi Author, Meet Dystopia


Sci-fi Author, Meet Dystopia
Dmitry Glukhovsky The Russian Life files

Science fiction author Dmitri Glukhovsky has been added to the Kremlin's wanted list for speaking out against Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

The offending item seems to be an Instagram post from March 12, which reads, "Stop the war! Admit that this is a war against an entire nation and stop it!" Alongside the text is a video showing a Russian tank, marked with the letter Z, in a street in Mariupol.

In a Telegram post from June 7, Glukhovsky showed a photo of the notice he received from the government and reiterated the views from his previous comment: "I am ready to repeat everything that is said there."

Although he is currently residing overseas, Glukhovsky could face up to fifteen years in prison if convicted under the new legislation introduced after the start of the war.

Glukhovsky is best known for his Metro 2033 novel and its sequels. The series takes place in a post-nuclear-war Russia, where factions must survive and battle in the shelter of the Moscow Metro. It was first published in installments online in 2002 and was commercially produced starting in 2005. Glukhovsky's work has been so successful internationally that it has been made into a series of video games.

Somewhat ironically, Glukhovsky began his career as a Kremlin journalist and has written for Russia Today, Euronews, and Deutche Welle. He was also interviewed by Russian Life back in 2008.

 

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