May 31, 2022

Russia Forever?


Russia Forever?
A sign of the times. RIA Novosti.

On May 28, the Russian-state-owned news outlet RIA Novosti published footage showing a trio of people replacing a Ukrainian road sign with one sporting a Russian flag and the words "Russia forever."

The clip, a mere 41 seconds long, shows Russian rock star Yulia Chicherina supervising a pair of soldiers, who are replacing the sign marking the entrance to the now-occupied town of Melitopol. What used to display the name of the town in Ukrainian and Latin letters now reads, "Melitopol: Russia forever."

The accompanying article strikes a triumphant tone, hailing the stunt as part of continued "denazification and demilitarization." The article also points out that similar measures will take place throughout conquered territory, as Ukrainian and Latin signage is to be replaced with Russian.

Melitopol is the second-largest city in Ukraine's southeastern Zaporizhzhia region, which has been seeing heavy fighting in recent days as Russian armed forces continue to consolidate their hold on the area.

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