May 30, 2022

Where the Streets Have Names


Where the Streets Have Names
The Kazimir Malevich street, formally known as Bozhenka. The name changed during Ukraine's decommunization period, a similar process is occurring in Russia. Misc Edit, Wikimedia Commons

Ukraine has begun a "derussification" of street names, replacing them with names of important Ukrainians.

Similar to Russia's "deukrainianization," Ukraine has decided to remove Russian street names and replace them with names like that of Ukrainian film director Nikolai Vingranovsky, literary critic Ivan Dzyuba, poet Vasyl Stus, and others. The list, however, does not include persons whose names have already been used in other places in Ukraine.

Ukrainians have until June 26 to submit suggestions for new street names. Dnipro has already changed over three dozen street names associated with Russia, Kyiv has changed the names of three railway stations, and Kharkiv has renamed three streets and a district in a show of breaking ties with a past closely connected to Russia.

 

 

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