July 07, 2023

Rolling in Rubles


Rolling in Rubles
The Bronze Horseman, St. Petersburg, Russia. Pavel Inozemtsev, Unsplash.

St. Petersburg Governor Alexander Beglov has endorsed legislation that would implement a resort fee within the city, as part of an initiative to enhance the development of resort infrastructure, according to an official statement released by the city administration's press service.

Effective from October 1, 2023, the resort fee would begin to be collected from tourists starting April 1, 2024. The fee is set at 100R (just over $1) per person per day and will be collected by hotels, hostels, and other temporary lodging establishments.

The funds acquired through the levy will be allocated to the reconstruction, maintenance, and repair of resort infrastructure, with a specific list of projects to be determined by the government.

The press service specified that the resort fee will not be imposed on tourists for their first day in St. Petersburg. Furthermore, the legislation includes more than 20 groups of individuals to be exempted from the fee, including individuals working within the city on employment or service contracts, as well as those who possess a registered residence in St. Petersburg.

Russia's Resort Fee Act was passed in July of 2017. In December 2022, Russian President Vladimir Putin extended the act's validity through December 31, 2024, adding St. Petersburg and the Sirius federal territory to the list of participants of the Resort Fee Act. The Altai, Krasnodar, and Stavropol Territories also collect a resort tax from tourists, ranging from 50 to 100R. Failure to pay the fee can result in an administrative fine of 500 to 2,000R.
 

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