May 01, 2020

Like a Drive-Thru, But Not


Like a Drive-Thru, But Not
Service with a smile. Ministry of Internal Affairs of the Russian Federation

Sometimes, you have to make the best of a bad situation. Like this person tried to.

A Russian man has been arrested for selling alcohol out of his apartment window. The 41-year-old from the city of Vologda was faced with a raid by the Ministry of Internal Affairs, which uncovered a little over two liters of alcohol doled out into smaller containers.

Police were reportedly notified after a neighbor saw a person buy a lotion bottle through the window. The man will be hit with a fine.

We can hardly blame this enterprising Vologdan, given the closure of many Russian alcohol providers due to coronavirus quarantine. But it begs the question: so it's OK if people sell books, but not with homemade moonshine?

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