October 17, 2022

Genocide Preventing Genocide


Genocide Preventing Genocide
The Peace Palace, the seat of the International Court of Justice. Flicker, United Nations Photo

The UN announced on October 6, that they had received Russia's formal objection against the case Ukraine has made, stating that genocide has been committed during Russia's invasion of Ukraine.

Earlier in the year, Russia argued against the accusations of genocide in Ukraine, claiming that the Genocide Convention is irrelevant and cannot regulate the use of force between states.

Both Russia and Ukraine signed the UN's 1948 Genocide Convention. During trials in March, Ukraine noted that the charter does not allow for a country to instigate an invasion to prevent being invaded.

The International Court of Justice (ICJ) ordered Russia to stop the invasion so as to properly evaluate Ukraine's claim that genocide was occurring. Russia refused, claiming that both sides would have to end the hostilities together.

Now that Russia has filed an official objection, the next step would be for the opposing nations to meet in court for the issue to be officially resolved.

 

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