April 17, 2020

Drones on the Front Lines


Drones on the Front Lines
What a cute little guy! Perfect for quarantine enforcement. U.S. Air Force, Public Domain

Every day we inch closer to living in a science-fiction film.

Entrepreneurs at the Russian Venture Company reported that tests are underway to determine the effectiveness of coronavirus-fighting-by-drone. Drones could be used throughout Russia in the near future to deliver medical supplies, disinfect streets, provide information to citizens, and generally monitor the streets during quarantine, like little robotic vigilantes.

The problem, it seems, is air traffic control. Current tests, conducted in Tver Oblast, focus on providing each drone enough airspace in which to operate without colliding with another drone. Working out this problem would allow for a new front in the fight against the pandemic.

Frankly, the possibility of seeing some cute little flying Robocops in the future has us tickled. And scared too, of course.

 

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