November 15, 2021

Crying Wolf, for Good Reason


Crying Wolf, for Good Reason
Here, boy! Mariomassone, Wikimedia Commons

Parents in the Ugra region have been applying to get their kids to take classes from home after a series of wolf sightings (and gruesome attacks on domestic animals) have made folks wary of leaving their children unattended.

The village of Zelenoborsk first saw a few wolves last year, and, as they went unmolested, apparently bred in close proximity to the settlement. While the wolves are most active at night, and video and photo evidence shows them at that time, apparently they're grown so brazen as to wander through town in broad daylight.

In response, the town authorities plan to begin a hunting campaign, and many families have opted to have their kids take school from home, COVID-style.

As majestic as these creatures are, and as cool as it would be to see one in the wild, we can't say that we'd be thrilled at the prospect of squaring off with one in the street. If only we were related to Rasputin...

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