January 07, 2022

A Firefighter's Best Friend


A Firefighter's Best Friend
They may not be Dalmatians, but these pups seem to get the job done.  Photo from the official website of the Russian Emergency Situations Ministry

When firefighters in the city of Kurgan were called to investigate a mysterious box left behind, they suspected that it might contain a bomb or some kind of harmful substance; instead, they were pleasantly surprised in the best possible way when they found eight adorable little puppies

The woman who reported the box flat out refused to keep the abandoned mutts, so the firefighters did the only thing they could do and took the animals back to the station with them. Six of the dogs immediately found good homes with family members of the fireteam, and the two that remained became the firehouse mascots. 

They decided to name the two fire-pups after the situation in which they were found: the male dog's name is Sapper (meaning mine-detector in Russian) and the female dog's name is Mina (meaning mine in Russian). The firefighters insist that their canine companions help them to do their jobs better and raise their spirits, giving them a reason to come back home after every dangerous mission.  

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