January 10, 2022

Top Dogs


Top Dogs
A photo you can hear. Wikimedia Commons, Rob Hanson

The Russian Cynological Society—an analogous organization to the American Kennel Club—recently released its list for the most popular dog breeds among Russian owners for 2021. The results may be surprising, but probably not.

Taking the number one spot, as for the last five years, was the German spitz, of which the Pomeranian is a popular sub-breed. In second place came the Chihuahua, followed by the Yorkshire terrier. The German shepherd, Labrador retriever, Jack Russell terrier, Central Asian shepherd, and French Bulldog all landed in the top ten.

Of note this year is an explosive rise in the popularity of the corgi, which made it into the top ten for the first time ever this year. Also seeing an uptick is the poodle, a dog known for its strong role as a companion animal.

While the Russian taste in dogs may tend towards the small (and yappy), one should remember that most Russians live in apartment buildings, where small dogs that require little exercise will be happier and easier to keep than large dogs that need a lot of space.

As for the spitz, even our favorite mustachioed dictator/president is a fan:

lukashenko and his dog
German spitzes are popular in Belarus, too, it seems. | The Russian Life files

 

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