March 01, 2020

Victory Train: Coming Soon to a Hero-City Near You



Victory Train: Coming Soon to a Hero-City Near You

A "Train-Museum" dubbed "Echelon of Victory" is set to travel around the railways of Russia and Belarus this spring to commemorate Soviet victory in the Second World War.

Toting anti-aircraft guns, tanks, arms, uniforms, and other artifacts on 18 carriages, the traveling exhibition will give patrons young and old the chance to get a glimpse of life in the Red Army.

The train is scheduled to make stops in 24 Russian and 2 Belarusian cities to memorialize the 75th anniversary of the end of the Great Patriotic War, as Russians call World War II. After visiting cities as diverse as Irkutsk, Minsk, and Kazan (as well as a stop or two in Crimea), the train will finish its journey in St. Petersburg, arriving on May 9: Victory Day.

2020 marks 75 years since the end of the War; expect Russian celebrations to go all-out. We've already started to see some patriotic stirrings.

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In this comprehensive, quixotic and addictive book, Edwin Trommelen explores all facets of the Russian obsession with vodka. Peering chiefly through the lenses of history and literature, Trommelen offers up an appropriately complex, rich and bittersweet portrait, based on great respect for Russian culture.
Marooned in Moscow

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This gripping autobiography plays out against the backdrop of Russia's bloody Civil War, and was one of the first Western eyewitness accounts of life in post-revolutionary Russia. Marooned in Moscow provides a fascinating account of one woman's entry into war-torn Russia in early 1920, first-person impressions of many in the top Soviet leadership, and accounts of the author's increasingly dangerous work as a journalist and spy, to say nothing of her work on behalf of prisoners, her two arrests, and her eventual ten-month-long imprisonment, including in the infamous Lubyanka prison. It is a veritable encyclopedia of life in Russia in the early 1920s.
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Maria's War: A Soldier's Autobiography

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A Taste of Russia

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Fish: A History of One Migration

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