April 09, 2021

Smells Like Money



Smells Like Money
For those who want their scent to say: "I spend all day in a bank."  Rudolf Simon, Wikimedia Commons

The state-owned Russian banking company, Sberbank, is looking to expand its commercial offerings to bring something a little closer to its customers' hearts, specifically with Sberbank-branded perfume

The proposed scent would be titled "Sberprime Plus" and is intended to encourage clients to create more pleasant shopping experiences within their bank. Because who wouldn't want to smell like a bank? 

As recently reported, perfume is one of the most popular gifts bought for Russian women, so it makes sense that the financial company would want to dip their toe (or nose) into that market. 

Even the Moscow Department of Transport is getting in on the perfume market. In September 2020, they announced the production of a movie-themed scent line, which is set to include a bottle titled "Bagrov's Sweater," after the main character of the famous Russian movie franchise, Brother

And if that isn't evidence enough, President Vladimir Putin himself also has his own self-branded scent line! Smells like a promising business venture indeed. 

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