June 04, 2022

Flowers in Kyiv


Flowers in Kyiv
Beautiful for any holiday. Pexels, Ryutaro Tsukata

May 30, 2022, marked the annual Day of Kyiv, honoring Ukraine's capital, and the spirit of the city is being commemorated through floral displays. Over the past two weeks, approximately 15,000 flowers have been planted or used in displays.

The first was created near Livoberezhna metro station and features a Ukrainian soldier and a Russian warship.

Since 1982, the Day of Kyiv has taken place each year on the last Sunday of May. While the typical celebration of partying, drinking, and dancing is not appropriate this year, some traditions remain.

The city's head of ecology and natural resources, Oleksandr Voznyi, said that 26 patriotic floral displays were planned for the day. This, he said, would both raise Ukrainian spirits and prepare for victory.

A competition to choose the best display will also take place between now to mid-summer, when the flowers are no longer blooming. A few of the floral creations can be seen here.

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