March 12, 2020

An Upside to Warm Winters


An Upside to Warm Winters
An assortment of vodkas looking for a new home. Would you be willing to take one in? Th1234, Wikimedia Commons

Russia has had a ridiculously warm winter this year. Fortunately, there's an upside to those melting ice caps: alcohol-related deaths are down.

According to Interfax.ru, in January 619 Russians died from alcohol poisoning. That might sound like a lot, but it's actually down 37.3 percent versus 2019. Likewise, 153 persons died from alcohol-related exposure: 46.1 percent fewer than last year.

The head of Russia's National Union for the Protection of Consumer Rights, Pavel Shapkin, explained to Interfax that the warmer temperatures "reduced the alcohol burden on public health." This is backed up by a recent trend: wine sales in early 2020 have increased, while vodka and cognac sales have slowed.

Maybe the lines at that distillery tour you've been meaning to take are shorter now?

 

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