Yaroslavl



Yaroslavl

Name: Maxim Grigoryev

Age: 28

Profession: Photojournalist

City: Yaroslavl and Tutaev

How long have you been doing photography?  I don't remember how long. Perhaps since my parents bought me a cheap film camera in elementary school. Very soon they regretted this,  because I often asked for money for film and printing.

What style or genre most interests you? My noname camera had a multi-exposure mode. Since then I've fallen in love with abstract photography.​

Can you give us a short description of your city? Where is it located? What is it famous for? 

Yaroslavl is a more than thousand-year-old city situated 250 kilometers from Moscow and sitting on both banks of the Volga River. It was named for Prince Yaroslav the Wise. Legend has it that he was the city's founder. Also, Yaroslavl is the capital of the "Golden Ring" - the most beautiful and histor-laden cities in Russia. Many of them are in Yaroslavl region.

What are some things that only locals would know about the city? 

  • The first professional dramatic theatre in Russia was founded in Yaroslavl in 1750 by a merchant's son, Fyodor Volkov. It was a few years after he became an actor. 
  • The first university in Northeast Russia was founded in Yaroslavl, in the beginning of a thirteenth century. It is called Grigoryevsky Zatvor. 
  • On the main square of Yaroslavl - Bogoyavlenskaya - you can see a monument to Yaroslav the Wise. Locals call it "Man with a Cake" because he is holding a small tower in his hand that looks like a cake.
  • Yaroslavl is one of two cities in Russia whose historic centre is protected as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The second is St. Petersburg.
  • Yaroslavl's kremlin actually is not a kremlin. It's a monastery, which was a small part of the old city. Now only two sections of the not-a-kremlin walls remain.
  • Yaroslavl was a capital of Russia. But only for a few years, during the Times of Troubles. The first Romanov tsar, Michael, signed the documents on accepting the Russian throne in Yaroslavl.

Which places or sites are a must for someone to see if they visit your city?

If you like real Russian history, you must just take a walk in the historic centre. Many old churches, monasteries and architectural treasures from different centuries are located there. You must also visit Volkov's Theatre, the State Art Museum, Governor's garden, the Volga embankment and Spassky monastery. And don't forget to visit the nearby towns of Rostov Veliky, Uglich, Pereslavl Zalesky and Tutaev. It is best to travel to Yaroslavl region in summer or early autumn.

Anything else? Yaroslavl people are very freedom-loving. History shows that they were the first to fight against injustice. But at the same time they are very peaceful and hospitable.

Instagram: gideonmaximus

 



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