July 06, 2022

"We Shall Return"


"We Shall Return"

“If the command of our army withdraws people from certain points of the front where the enemy has the greatest fire superiority — in particular this applies to Lysychansk — it means only one thing: we will return thanks to our tactics, thanks to the increase in the supply of modern weapons.”

– Ukrainian President Zelensky addressing the loss of Lysychansk

The weeks-long battle for Lysychansk finally ended on July 3, with Russia claiming control of the city. The battle completes Russia's invasion of the Luhansk area, a separatist region in eastern Ukraine run by a Russia-friendly (and Russia-backed) government that helped spark the invasion into Ukraine. 

Luhansk is the first of the two break-away Ukrainian regions to be taken by Russian forces. Sergei Haidai, former Ukrainian governor of Luhansk, said "the loss of the Luhansk region is painful because it is the territory of Ukraine. For me personally, this is special. This is the homeland where I was born and I am also the head of the region.”

President Zelensky said he is confident that the region will be returned to Ukraine in the near future.

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