October 15, 2021

The Sweetest Stowaway


The Sweetest Stowaway
The Russian idiom for catching a free ride on public transportation is "to ride like a rabbit" (ехать зайцем). Maybe "ride like a kitten" would be more appropriate here. Photo via YouTube

Andrei Podluzhy found the best travel partner near his truck while it was parked in the Nizhny Novgorod region: an adorable but filthy little kitten. At first, Podluzhny even believed that the kitten might have been blind, but after Podluzhky gave the poor thing a bath its eyes opened right up. 

Podluzhy decided to make the kitten a copilot and named it Mersik. Together they traveled to more than ten Russian cities. During the day, Mersik would play in the truck's cabin, and at night sleep at the feet of his trusty chauffeur. 

Once this precious story hit major news sites, the public also became interested in giving the sweet kitten a forever home. The family who adopted Mersik determined that the kitten was actually female, and so renamed her Mercy. Today, Mercy's life on the road is far behind her.

Russian cats have traveled far and wide, by plane, train, and tram (thanks, Bulgakov)... what's next? Hopefully, (for their sake) not by boat. 

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