September 04, 2021

Russia's Olympic Bid


Russia's Olympic Bid
Here's hoping these two flags will merge in 2036. Via kremlin.ru

Russia is hoping to win the 2036 Summer Olympic Games. By which we mean, to win the chance to host the Games. But it probably wants to win the most golds, too.

Several Russian cities are fighting other cities of the world for the honor, but Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov thinks St. Petersburg and Kazan have the best chance, with the oddly-named (for English speakers anyway) Rostov-on-Don a runner-up.

Russia has hosted the Olympic Games twice: the Summer Games in Moscow in 1980 (Soviet Union) and the Winter Games in Sochi in 2014. For comparison, the United States has hosted the Games eight times, and it will do it a ninth time in 2028.

The winner of the 2036 contest is not expected to be announced until either 2025 or 2029 – so don't get too excited.

Here's hoping Russian athletes can at least compete under their own flag and anthem by 2036.

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