December 04, 2020

More than Early Birds and Night Owls


More than Early Birds and Night Owls
How does your energy flow throughout the day? Image by King of Hearts via Wikimedia Commons

Are you an early bird («жаворонок»), always waking up early and getting a good start to your day? Or maybe you’re a night owl («сова»), preferring to start your day a little later? These two traditional classifications are popular both in the US and Russia, but now scientists at the RUDN Institute of Medicine have determined more specific prototypes than just being an early bird or a night owl.

Research was conducted on over 2,000 students, to try to determine what classifications fit better with the majority of the population. Students underwent testing to determine how they feel at different points of the day. Based on their results, scientists created four new classifications: highly active, moderately active, daytime active, and daytime sleepy.

The new classifications are unique in the way they analyze people’s energy levels throughout the day. The highly active type is the most lucky, as they are classified as being active throughout the day. Moderately active people have a moderate flow of energy throughout the day. Daytime active types are low-energy in the morning, but then become more energetic in the middle of the day. Finally, daytime sleepy people are highly active in the morning, but their energy drops throughout the day.

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