May 20, 2022

McDonald's Unhappy Departure


McDonald's Unhappy Departure
Our buddy, Ronald McDonald. Wikimedia Commons, Simon Burchell

McDonald’s announced it will completely withdraw from Russia because of the country's invasion of Ukraine.

All of McDonald’s 850 restaurants temporarily closed in March, after the onset of the war, yet all 62,000 company employees continued to receive their salaries. Now McDonald’s has said that the company’s values do align with what is happening in Ukraine and the humanitarian crisis that has resulted. The company is expected to take a R77.55 – 90.475 billion ($1.2 – 1.4 billion) loss as a result of this move.

McDonald's had a 32-year run in the Russian Federation. The first McDonald’s opened on January 31, 1990, on Pushkinskaya Square in central Moscow. It's opening was heralded as a sign of the opening up of the Soviet economy and the beginning of a new era.

McDonald’s is searching for someone to buy the restaurant chain's property, though the McDonald’s logo, menu, name, or letter “M” cannot be used. Until a buyer is found, the company said, all employees will continue to be paid.

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