March 06, 2024

"Healer" Clairvoyant Arrested for Fraud


"Healer" Clairvoyant Arrested for Fraud
She can see your future: you will be deeply in debt.  TASS/Yuri Samolygo

Those who sought out the services of a psychic in Volgograd region, specifically the city of Kotelnikovo, got some very bad karma.

Izvestia found Kotelnikovo to be rife with all sorts of bogus supernatural and spiritual practitioners.

The small city is home to the self-proclaimed clairvoyant "Healer Lyuba," who was arrested on February 27 for charging a client upwards of R67 million ($730,300). 

A court in Moscow arrested the clairvoyant, identified only as Lyubov A., after her former client, a Muscovite IT worker, reported her to the police. The IT worker, who remains anonymous, reported that Lyubov A. convinced her that "evil" had been done to her and that she, Lyubov, could remove these "curses and evil spirits."

"Healer Lyuba" accepted payment from her IT victim via cash and bank transfer. 

Under Russian law, fraud of this kind is punishable by up to 10 years in prison and a fine of up to one million rubles ($10,900).

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